What’s changed in linked data implementations in the last three years?

Linking Open Data cloud diagram 2017, by Andrejs Abele, John P. McCrae, Paul Buitelaar, Anja Jentzsch and Richard Cyganiak. http://lod-cloud.net/ by CC-BY-SA license.

OCLC Research conducted an “International Linked Data Survey for Implementers” in 2014 and 2015, attracting responses from a total of 90 institutions in 20 countries.  In the 2015 survey, 168 linked data projects or services were reported, of which 112 were described; 61% of them had been in production for over two years. This represented a doubling of the number of relatively “mature” linked data implementations compared to the 2014 results.

We are curious – what might have changed in the last three years? OCLC Research has decided to repeat its survey to learn details of new projects or services that format metadata as linked data and/or make subsequent uses of it that have launched since the last survey. And we are interested in what might have changed in linked data implementations or plans reported in the previous surveys.

The questions are mostly the same so we can more easily compare results. The target audience are staff who have implemented or are implementing linked data projects or services, either by publishing data as linked data, by consuming linked data resources into their own data or applications, or both.

So if you have implemented or are implementing a linked data project or service, please take the 2018 survey! The link:

https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/LinkedDataSurvey2018

We are asking that responses be completed by 25 May 2018. As with the previous surveys, we will share the examples collected for the benefit of others wanting to undertake similar efforts and add the responses to those from the 2014 and 2015 surveys (without contact information) available in this Excel workbook.

What do you think has changed in the last three years?

Karen Smith-Yoshimura, senior program officer, works on topics related to creating and managing metadata with a focus on large research libraries and multilingual requirements.

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