Monday night epiphany

Sometimes a technology is just a technology until you have had that magical experience of basking in the rays of the light bulb which just flicked on over your head. I had one of those epiphanies on Monday night while paying my bills online. I noticed a link that I hadn’t paid attention to so …

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Highlights from SAA

I returned from the Society of American Archivists annual meeting on Saturday – the meeting had not yet concluded, but I had a date with destiny (my high school reunion, and don’t worry, there won’t be any further details). I attended some excellent sessions and heard reports on some interesting projects. I’d like to call …

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EAD Report Card now yours for the taking

A few weeks ago, I told you that we were testing the open source version of the RLG EAD Report Card. I’m pleased to announce that the files are now available . There are two version of the Report Card, one for the desktop and one for a webserver. The webserver version will require that …

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grab-bag of LAM news

I haven’t really seen this make the rounds yet, so I thought I’d write it up here – the Library of Congress just announced that it has launched a website to document the work of a new committee charged with investigating changes in current copyright law to accommodate the needs of digital preservation. Looking at …

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Metasearch – Everybody knows

A report on a Metasearch survey among RLG Members was posted on the RLG website the other day. The survey was done during May and June and consisted of interviews with a small set of institutions that are at various stages of implementing metasearch facilities for their communities. I’m not sure that this topic has …

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Buy or borrow?

Most of you have probably heard by now that Google announced to put a temporary hold on scanning books that are within copyright from its partner libraries – the story was all over the media (to quote a staid resource, take the Washington Post ). Google says they’ll respect the wishes of any publisher who’ll …

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Cabinets of Curiosities

At our 2005 member forum, Günter talked about the European “cabinets of curiosities” or Wunderkammern, popular in the 16th and 17th centuries. Precursors to today’s libraries and museums, these privately held collections brought together beautiful and wonderful items from around the world based on collectors’ interests. A posting in Boing Boing earlier this week brings …

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From DAMS to preservation

On a recent trip to NYC I had the good fortune of spending some time with Barbara Bridgers and her staff in the photography studio of the MET. We spent most of the morning chatting about digital asset management, since the MET is on the verge of acquiring a high-end system to keep track of …

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Bazookas and Box Cutters

Balancing access and security is certainly an appropriate topic for the hangingtogether blog. From Baghdad to Boston, there are security crises facing our cultural institutions. A few months ago the National Archives and Records Administration in Washington DC organized a mini-conference called “Vulnerable Valuable Documents”. Several members of the International Council on Archives Executive Committee …

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