Learning Commons: well-made in Japan

During a very hectic, very interesting week visiting research libraries in Japan last week I had the good fortune to tour the new (April 2013) Learning Commons at Doshisha University. It is not a library-managed facility but the library helps to staff it along with other Student Support Services staff. The facility itself is as good an implementation as I’ve seen anywhere including the new facilities at North Carolina State University’s new library. The Doshisha University Learning Commons brochure

The Commons itself is a multi-story structure constructed adjacent to the library and connected to the library at various levels. As a consequence students can move very freely from the collections and quiet of the traditional library to the group study, presentation, production and technology areas of the learning commons. There are plenty of visible but unobtrusive staff available to the students. People in red jackets offer technology support, in blue jackets peer instruction and guidance, in yellow you get media production and on each floor a desk staffed by a librarian.

There are no fixed furnishings in the entire facility. Everything can be moved. As an experiment they left one group study space with two tables without rollers. That space is the most infrequently used in the building. I was impressed with the energy of the staff and the enthusiasm of the students. The location of the facility bordering on one of the busiest streets in Kyoto purposely serves to advertise the learning environment of this private university. The big study and computing rooms are lined up along picture windows that face out onto this boulevard ensuring that Kyoto citizens know that Doshisha is a good place to learn.

Check out some photos taken during my walk-through in this Flickr set. Look for the Global Village sign that designates an area where no Japanese is to be spoken.

P.S. After the original post my colleagues at Doshisha advised me that an English language version of their Learning Commons brochure is available (.pdf).

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