You Must See This

I blog in so many places I can hardly see straight. So please forgive me for pointing you to a different blog to see my latest post on what an RLG Partner institution has done. Heck, I’m even old enough that I can claim a “senior moment” over whether to post here, there, or elsewhere. …

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Tranformational Times – 3 sentences plus

The Association of Research Libraries membership meeting that concluded last Friday was themed Transformational Times. It was organized to encourage inter-institutional collaboration and creative responses to funding challenges. The presentations were uniformly strong and largely stuck to the theme. What emerged for me overall was a sense that this group of libraries has internalized the …

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Digital Image Licensing – The debate rages on…

Whenever the topic of digital image licensing comes up, I listen closely. While my eyes tend to glaze over when somebody tries to explain the legalese of it all to me (I’m sure it’s my fault), I find this discussion fascinating when individuals relate access to high quality images to the mission of their institution, …

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RLG Partnership meeting: going, going…

We’ve recently put the final touches on the agenda for the RLG Partnership meeting, June 1-2 in Boston. We have quite an array of attractive programming, including: 13 update sessions: briefings on projects we have underway 7 “cool tool” demos: a peek under the hood, with demonstrations of prototypes (and functioning services) put together by …

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Bottoms-up for bottom-up

I don’t know whether colleagues in the US talk about effective change requiring initiatives which are both top-down and bottom-up, but it’s a pairing we often approve in the UK. It has perhaps been nowhere more evident as a strategy than in the development of repositories in recent years. The top-down work looks for mandates …

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“Knee deep in stuff”

“36 pages or less”  is the definition of ephemera. The feisty folks at the California Historical Society set up this blog for the hidden collections grant they received from CLIR/Mellon. Their project experiments with methods to describe huge amounts of materials in four interrelated collections of California ephemera in the Bay Area.  Wendy and Tanya …

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Out of the locker room and into the classroom

A recent article in the Washington Post reports on the use of primary sources in the classroom at Stuart-Hobson Middle School. Nothing new there — except that the primary source materials are school records, dating back to 1926. Use of these records (processed using funds from IMLS) puts students in direct contact with elements of …

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Monster Mashathon

“From my laboratory in the castle east To the master bedroom where the vampires feast The ghouls all came from their humble abodes To get a jolt from my electrodes They did the mash They did the monster mash” – The Monster Mash, Bobby “Boris” Pickett We just wrapped up two days of heavy-duty geek-ery …

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Impact Measures and Library Selection

I have just been reading a recent article by Kathy Enger* published in Library & Information Science Research that examines the potential value of citation analysis as a selection tool in academic library acquisitions. Enger proposes that citation analysis of the journal literature might be used to identify potentially high-impact books for inclusion in a …

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Information architecture and music

Two former RLG staff members (and two of my favorite, really interesting people) recently met up in their current professional roles. Dylan Tweney, former RLG writer, now senior editor at Wired.com, and keynote speaker at our 2007 RLG Partners meeting interviewed Zoe Keating about her music and creative process. Zoe is a fantastic cello player …

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