Yet more social metadata for LAMs

Today we released Social Metadata for Libraries, Archives, and Museums, Part 3: Recommendations and Readings. This is the last in a series of three reports a 21-member Social Metadata Working Group from five countries produced as the result of our research in 2009 and 2010. The cultural heritage organizations in the OCLC Research Library Partnership …

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Five Easy Pieces

I seem to have acquired an obsession. This obsession manifests itself in various ways, but one clear way is that I can’t seem to stop thinking about some of the findings from my colleague’s work that resulted in the publication Implications of MARC Tag Usage on Library Metadata Practices. Chief among them, in my view, …

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More social metadata for LAMs

Today we released Social Metadata for Libraries, Archives, and Museums, Part 2: Survey Analysis. This is the second of a series of three reports a 21-member Social Metadata Working Group from five countries produced as the result of our research in 2009 and 2010. The cultural heritage organizations in the OCLC Research Library Partnership have …

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FAST on the street

I’m pleased to say that today OCLC Research released FAST (Faceted Application of Subject Terminology) as linked data under an Open Data Commons Attribution license. FAST has been a multi-year project of OCLC Research in collaboration with the Library of Congress. The FAST authority file is an enumerative, faceted subject heading schema derived from the …

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The tail of the COMET (Project)

Today the University of Cambridge released the final dataset from its COMET (Cambridge Open METadata) project. The final dataset contains more than 600,000 records derived from OCLC’s WorldCat available as both Marc21 and RDF triples under an Open Data Commons Attribution License (ODC-BY). All the previous data sets released, as well as this one, have …

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Social metadata for LAMs

Metadata helps users locate resources that meet their specific needs. But metadata also helps us to understand the data we find and helps us to evaluate what we should spend our time on. Traditionally, staff at libraries, archives, and museums (LAMs) create metadata for the content they manage. However, social metadata—content contributed by users—is evolving …

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A crowdsourcing success story

I’m a great fan of the National Library of Australia’s Trove, a single search interface to 122 million resources—books, journals, photos, digitized newspapers, archives, maps, music, videos, Web sites—focused on Australia and Australians. You can search the OCR’d text of over 45 million newspaper articles that have been digitized. OCR is not perfect. The original …

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More From the “Murky Bucket”

The inspiration for my title comes from Lorcan Dempsey, who some years ago, before I joined him at OCLC, put a name to the unease I had been feeling about the state of library metadata. In a Library Journal column I had bemoaned the fact that not only was it impossible for library users to …

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Analyzing MARC tags and projecting MARC’s future

The RLG Partners working group that has been gathering and analyzing evidence over the past two years about MARC tag usage to inform library metadata practices completed its work. The 72-page Implications of MARC Tag Usage on Library Metadata Practices report was published on March 12 — with links to thirteen detailed data tables for …

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