Elusive Quality

We talk a lot about data curation, but rarely about data quality. How do researchers determine if a dataset is appropriate for their intended purposes? They may need to know how the data was gathered (sometimes including the sensor equipment used and how it was calibrated), the degree of accuracy of the data, what null …

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Born Digital for Those Born Analog

The first outcome of an ongoing OCLC Research activity, Demystifying Born Digital, is a report, You’ve Got to Walk Before You Can Run: First Steps for Managing Born-Digital Content Received on Physical Media. Jackie Dooley and I submitted a draft of this document to some of the smartest people we know (see the list here) …

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Reimagining the Archive

A couple of weeks ago the UCLA Film & Television Archive hosted “Reimagining the Archive,” a three-day conference that brought together archivists, scholars, artists, creators of digital humanities projects, and assorted others to hear about a wide-ranging array of digital initiatives. While there was a certain focus on the moving-image realm, the papers went far …

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Research dissemination and ‘the archive’

Ithaka S+R recently published its Faculty Survey 2009: Key Strategic Insights for Libraries, Publishers, and Societies. It considers the way faculty views of the library are changing, and analyses library roles into three key functions: “The library is a starting point or ‘gateway’ for locating information for my research” (which we refer to as the gateway function). “The library pays for resources …

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The Cult of Brewster Finds Its Church

Last night Brewster Kahle of the Internet Archive unveiled his latest project in a venue suitable for any high priest or cult leader — a former Christian Science Church in San Francisco. As it turns out, the Internet Archive recently purchased the building, and as Brewster remarked during the grand unveiling of the Bookserver project, …

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John R. Stokes, Imaging Innovator

John R. Stokes passed away this weekend. This caused me to reflect on both his career and mine. When I started at the Library of Congress in 1985, I was an early entrant into the library imaging scene, but John Stokes was already there. He captured some of LC’s huge photo collections, at that time …

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