A crowdsourcing success story

I’m a great fan of the National Library of Australia’s Trove, a single search interface to 122 million resources—books, journals, photos, digitized newspapers, archives, maps, music, videos, Web sites—focused on Australia and Australians. You can search the OCR’d text of over 45 million newspaper articles that have been digitized. OCR is not perfect. The original …

More

On building community

Almost a year ago, we hosted Undue Diligence and released the “Well-intentioned practice for putting digitized collections of unpublished materials online” document (we just call it WIP). The point behind the event and the document (and all of the preparation that went into both!) was to contribute to the professional, community of practice that is …

More

Pat the Elephant

There is a well-known fable about blind men with contrasting views on the anatomy of an elephant, each having examined a separate piece of the beast and independently concluded that it is either very like a spear, or a fan, or a snake, etc.  Even in combination their observations fail to provide a very good …

More

Focus and reframe: rights and unpublished materials

I’m using this blog posting to wrap together a bunch of ideas I’ll be presenting at a meeting tomorrow, Undue Diligence: Seeking Low-risk Strategies for Making Collections of Unpublished Materials More Accessible. Mark Greene and Dennis Meissner helped to reframe processing modern archival collections in More Product, Less Process. Similarly, Shifting Gears helped to recast …

More

Europeana at the Halfway Mark

For the recent LIBER/EBLIDA workshop on digitization at the Koninklijke Bibliotheek in The Hague, I was asked to provide a view on Europeana from the US perspective. Of course, I neither speak for the US nor do I have inside information about Europeana, but I’d been following it from afar and had read just about …

More