LC-Flickr: updating the catalog

In the context of John MacColl’s guest blog on Karen Calhoun’s Metalogue, I was reminded of the stats from the LC-Flickr project pertaining to changes LC made in their own catalog prompted by insightful Flickr comments. When I last updated my Flickr slides for a class at Syracuse University, I found 174 records containing the …

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A Map to Destinations Uncrawled

As part of what we’re trying to accomplish in the “Modeling New Service Infrastructures” part of the RLG Work Agenda, I’ve been working on a white paper on best practices for enhancing disclosure of library, museum and archive content at the network level. Using a sitemap to better expose content to web search engines such …

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More on Flickr

A few more Flickr related things: The Boston Public Library has posted photos to Flickr. Like Library of Congress, the collections are open to commentary and tags, although initially they were not. From a brief scan of the collection, there are considerably fewer comments on the items than on items in LCs Flickr collections. I …

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Browsing audio

Recently I realized that I’m spending almost as much time in “professional listening” as I am doing “professional reading”. So many interviews, Webcasts, TED talks, Google Tech Talks, and the like! So I was intrigued indeed when I read about Searching Video Lectures, a tool from MIT that leverages decades of speech-recognition research to convert …

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Visual reminder

A visual reminder of how many places we have to search. sputtr.com Far from complete. WorldCat.org, LibraryThing, etc. are not even on the list. Merrileehttp://oclc.org/research/people/proffitt.html

Books are objects too

Lorcan recently brought my attention to a conference where he will be speaking. It’s the mid-term meeting of LIBER where they will have a think tank on the future value of the book as artefact and the future value of digital documentary heritage at the National Library of Sweden in Stockholm 24-25 May 2007. I’m …

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A wonderful specimen of a user!

We’re always on the look-out for this mystical creature called “the user,” and I am exited to report a public sighting: for a good hour during the Bibliographic Control Working Group public meeting, we had a superb specimen right in front of us. Dr. Timothy Burke, an Associate Professor in the Department of History at …

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